We are an independent, voluntary organization aimed at promoting and preserving the heritage and natural environment of Allesley, Coundon Wedge and adjoining neighbourhoods.

Please note that the site is currently being updated and revamped after being down for a year, so please bear with us

Any opinions quoted on the site are those of the editor(s) and may not always reflect the views of the society

 

Coundon Wedge is a particularly attractive stretch of countryside on the north-western outskirts of Coventry. Predominantly grassland with mature trees and hedgerows, it is criss-crossed by footpaths making it readily accessible to all those who want to enjoy this delightful remnant of the historic Arden landscape. Adjacent to the Wedge is the Allesley Village Conservation Area where Thomas Telford's Birmingham Road is flanked by a charming and distinctive array of buildings, many dating from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. To see for yourself what makes it so special, please take a look at our picture gallery or better still, let one of our free leaflets guide you on a walk through the village and some of the most beautiful countryside around Coventry.

Did you know that Allesley and Coundon Wedge is officially recognised as a Local Wildlife Site?

A Local Wildlife Survey of Allesley and Coundon Wedge was undertaken by Habitat Biodiversity Audit Partnership (HBA) in November 2013. Coventry City Council are Project Partners of HBA, together with the other adjacent Local Authorities, Warwickshire Wildlife Trust, Natural England and the Environment Agency.

This detailed survey of Allesley and Coundon Wedge found an extensive range of important ecological features that supported rare species of wildlife including plants, insects, birds, mammals and amphibians.
Old hay meadows and pastures that have not been damaged by modern farming methods were found to still survive here and supported an abundance of wildlife. This grassland and ancient hedgerows were described as an “increasingly rare habitat within Warwickshire”.
Important plant species found during the survey included Harebell, Oval Sedge, Remote Sedge, Yellow Archangel, Lady’s Bedstraw, Pignut and Wood Melick.
Important amphibians included Great Crested Newt, Smooth Newt and Common Toad.
In terms of mammals; Badger, Stoat, Weasel, Hedgehog and various species of bats were recorded.
A very great diversity of birds were recorded by the survey including Song Thrush, Mistle Thrush, Spotted Flycatcher, Linnet, Kingfisher, Kestrel, Sparrowhawk, Buzzard, Raven, Stock Dove, Tawny and Little Owls, Moorhen, Green and Great Spotted Woodpeckers, Swallow, Swift, House Martin, Grey Wagtail, Whitethroat, Garden Warbler, Blackcap, Chiffchaff, Willow Warbler, Goldcrest, Long Tailed Tit, Coal Tit, Nuthatch, Treecreeper, Jay, Jackdaw, Bullfinch and Reed Bunting.
Flocks of Redwings, Fieldfares, Siskins and Redpolls were observed in the autumn and winter. Passage migrant birds included Restart, Whinchat and Wheatear.
Amongst many butterflies the survey recorded Common Blue, Small Copper, Speckled Wood, Small Heath and the regionally scarce Essex Skipper.

This comprehensive ecological survey resulted in Allesley and Coundon Wedge being formally designated as a Local Wildlife Site (LWS). The Wedge now has the significant status of being one of the most important wildlife sites outside those categorised as Sites of Special Scientific Interest.
As a designated Local Wildlife Site, Allesley and Coundon Wedge is identified as an area of important nature conservation features which should be properly safeguarded in the long term.

It is accepted good practice that Local Wildlife Site status should always be very carefully considered by the planning authority when assessing any planning applications that may have adverse impacts on ecology, wildlife and amenity value.

 

 

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